Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Culture MattersAnglo-American Relations and the Intangibles of 'Specialness'$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert M. Hendershot and Steve Marsh

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781526151421

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7765/9781526151438

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Debating Downton

Debating Downton

Anglo-American realities and relations1

Chapter:
(p.90) 4 Debating Downton
Source:
Culture Matters
Author(s):

Dana Cooper

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526151438.00009

Dana Cooper assesses the cultural power of television in her analysis of Anglo-American narratives within the PBS series Downton Abbey, which became a financial success as well as a cultural phenomenon following its launch in 2010. Pointing out that the show’s aristocratic central family is inspired by the historical ‘dollar princesses,’ the hundreds of wealthy American women who married British men between 1865 and 1945, Cooper scrutinizes how the fictional characters, their dialogue, and their biases reflect American perceptions of themselves and their cultural cousins, and vice versa, and questions just how Anglo-American identity differences transitioned over time from sources of tension to sources of popular entertainment.

Keywords:   Anglo-American, Downton Abbey, television, identity, media, dollar princesses, cultural history

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.