Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Distant SistersAustralasian Women and the International Struggle for the Vote, 1880-1914$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Keating

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781526140951

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7765/9781526140968

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Shaking hands across the seas: The Australasian women’s advocacy press

Shaking hands across the seas: The Australasian women’s advocacy press

Chapter:
(p.133) 4 Shaking hands across the seas: The Australasian women’s advocacy press
Source:
Distant Sisters
Author(s):

James Keating

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526140968.00011

This chapter details the rise of Australasian women’s advocacy newspapers – rivalled only by the contemporary British and American feminist press in their range and proliferation – as the colonial suffrage campaigns transformed into organised movements in the late 1880s. Considering these titles as a coherent entity for the first time, it reveals the filaments that connected authors, editors, and audiences in a Tasman world and to a wider ‘imperial commons’. It finds that cooperative production, regional circulation, and communal reading practices engendered transnational solidarity, if not always collective action, among readers. Along with its analysis of these papers’ operation and decline, the chapter considers the racial, geographic, and ideological limits of Australasian publications. It concludes with a comparative content analysis of five representative newspapers between 1894 and 1902, finding that the worldview presented to readers was neither as expansive nor as cosmopolitan as its producers and later historians have claimed.

Keywords:   Australia, circulation, imperial commons, New Zealand, reading, Tasman world, women’s advocacy press

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.