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Early modern war narratives and the Revolt in the Low Countries$
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Raymond Fagel, Leonor Álvarez Francés, and Beatriz Santiago Belmonte

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781526140869

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7765/9781526140876

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

North and south: a comparison of episodic war narratives during the Revolt in the Low Countries1

North and south: a comparison of episodic war narratives during the Revolt in the Low Countries1

Chapter:
(p.146) 8 North and south: a comparison of episodic war narratives during the Revolt in the Low Countries1
Source:
Early modern war narratives and the Revolt in the Low Countries
Author(s):

Jasper van der Steen

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526140876.00015

The Revolt divided the Low Countries into two polities: the Habsburg Netherlands in the south and the new Dutch Republic in the north. Historians have demonstrated that people in the north and south interpreted the rebellion very differently. This chapter analyses the development of episodic war narratives produced in the two different parts of the Low Countries, a loyal Habsburg part in the south, and a rebel state in the north. War narratives in the two parts diverged because of the function war memories had in society. In the Catholic south a consensual Catholic narrative could be constructed, while the religiously divided north preferred a national narrative with the Spaniards as the common enemy. Local factors such as religion and the political system also strongly influenced the ways in which stories about loyalists were told. This chapter investigates how propagandists and historical chroniclers portrayed loyalists during the period 1590–1621. This was a period in which the north and south became increasingly irreconcilable, even though on both sides of the border authors sought to persuade audiences on the other side.

Keywords:   historical canon, war narratives, Habsburg Low Countries, Dutch Revolt, Memory

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