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Critical design in JapanMaterial culture, luxury, and the avant-garde$
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Ory Bartal

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781526139979

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.7765/9781526139986

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The 1968 social uprising and subversive advertising design in Japan: the work of Ishioka Eiko and Suzuki Hachirō

The 1968 social uprising and subversive advertising design in Japan: the work of Ishioka Eiko and Suzuki Hachirō

Chapter:
(p.54) 2 The 1968 social uprising and subversive advertising design in Japan: the work of Ishioka Eiko and Suzuki Hachirō
Source:
Critical design in Japan
Author(s):

Ory Bartal

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526139986.00008

This chapter presents the avant-garde and subversive advertising design that operated on the margins of the newly emerged advertising industry. This was created for the new consumer culture of the 1960s alongside the new national style that was created for the 1964 Olympic Games and the 1970 Expo. This era, following the economic miracle, was known as the first golden age of graphic design and advertising in postwar Japan. The subversive graphic design is presented by means of two innovative advertising campaigns: the Fuji-Xerox campaign and the Parco campaign. These campaigns were created during the 1970s by two major art directors, Suzuki Hachirō and Ishioka Eiko, who transformed advertising design by blurring the boundaries between commercial and subversive styles. Their campaigns encapsulated the new critical spirit (including ecological, feminist, and anti-institutional concerns) at the heart of the period’s mainstream consumer culture. These campaigns are presented in the context of subversive, countercultural Japanese graphic design as well as of the mainstream commercial and national advertising posters of the same era.

Keywords:   Japanese advertising, Japanese graphic design, Visual communication, Subversive advertising, Suzuki Hachirō, Ishioka Eiko, Design and ecology, Design and feminism

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