Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Arts of Angela CarterA Cabinet of Curiosities$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526136770

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.7765/9781526136787

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms

Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: Angela Carter’s curious rooms
Source:
The Arts of Angela Carter
Author(s):

Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526136787.00007

Angela Carter was fascinated by the trope of the curious room and cabinets of curiosities. This introduction considers her work in relation to space, which includes an exhibition inspired by her life and work, co-curated by the editor, and set out in an art gallery as a series of curious rooms. This was one of many events marking the twenty-fifth anniversary since her death which specifically drew attention to her links with Bristol, since place, as well as space, was important to Carter. She lived in the city for nearly ten years, which provided a setting for her Bristol trilogy of novels. Carter also lived in the neighbouring city of Bath where she wrote her most important non-fictional work, The Sadeian Woman (1978). This chapter reveals that the time she lived in the West Country was the most productive of her writing career, despite her being regarded mainly as a London writer. It also draws attention to the diversity of Carter’s interests and how that is reflected in the chapters which follow. These fall into distinct subject areas, such as psychogeography, music, art, theatre, anthropology, translation and religion and have been written by leading and lesser-known scholars show-casing Carter’s multi-disciplinarily.

Keywords:   space, place, rooms, Bristol, multi-disciplinarity

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.