Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Martial MasculinitiesExperiencing and Imagining the Military in the Long Nineteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Brown, Anna Maria Barry, and Joanne Begatio

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526135629

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7765/9781526135636

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 25 June 2022

‘And the individual withers’: Tennyson and the enlistment into military masculinity

‘And the individual withers’: Tennyson and the enlistment into military masculinity

Chapter:
(p.178) 8 ‘And the individual withers’: Tennyson and the enlistment into military masculinity
Source:
Martial Masculinities
Author(s):

Lorenzo Servitje

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526135636.00016

While Tennyson’s ‘Locksley Hall’ is often discussed in terms of masculinity and empire, the military and social context of the speaker’s subject position as an enlisted soldier remains unexplored. This chapter suggests that when read in light of the British soldier’s precarious socioeconomic position in the early Victorian period, the poem’s formal qualities subvert its militaristic and imperialist narrative. The poem reveals how the early Victorian military’s making of the man ‘conscribes’ the individual into the whole but at the same time obfuscates the complexities of actualising this masculine subjectivity. This reading shows how the poetic form provided Tennyson the means to deploy masculinity in support of the military’s participation in the grand narrative of progress while critiquing the resulting effects.

Keywords:   poetry, Tennyson, Locksley Hall, dramatic monologue, soldier, army, military, masculinity

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.