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Martial MasculinitiesExperiencing and Imagining the Military in the Long Nineteenth Century$
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Michael Brown, Anna Maria Barry, and Joanne Begatio

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526135629

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7765/9781526135636

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Hunger and cannibalism: James Hogg’s deconstruction of Scottish military masculinities in The Three Perils of Man or War, Women, and Witchcraft!

Hunger and cannibalism: James Hogg’s deconstruction of Scottish military masculinities in The Three Perils of Man or War, Women, and Witchcraft!

Chapter:
(p.139) 6 Hunger and cannibalism: James Hogg’s deconstruction of Scottish military masculinities in The Three Perils of Man or War, Women, and Witchcraft!
Source:
Martial Masculinities
Author(s):

Barbara Leonardi

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526135636.00014

This chapter contends that hunger and cannibalism are extended metaphors that James Hogg utilises in his novel The Three Perils of Man (1822) to denounce the human losses in the Napoleonic Wars and to convey an indirect critique of the violent death of so many millions in the campaign of Buonaparte. In so doing, Hogg deconstructs the potent stereotype of Highland masculinity, so pivotal in the militaristic discourse of the British Empire. Hogg exposes the ideology of self-sacrifice of the British soldier explicitly in two poetical works: ‘The Pilgrims of the Sun’ (1815) and ‘The Field of Waterloo’ (1822), the first published and the second composed in the same year of Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo, while conveying the same critique more implicitly some years later in Perils of Man, where the hunger for meat is a ubiquitous trope meant to expose the destructiveness of tyrannical power.

Keywords:   James Hogg, The Three Perils of Man, ‘The Pilgrims of the Sun’, ‘The Field of Waterloo’, Highland soldier, Scottish masculinity, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe, Castle Dangerous

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