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Critical Race Theory and Inequality in the Labour MarketRacial Stratification in Ireland$
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Ebun Joseph

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781526134394

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.7765/9781526134400

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Evidence of racial stratification in Ireland: comparing the labour market outcomes of Spanish, Polish and Nigerian migrants

Evidence of racial stratification in Ireland: comparing the labour market outcomes of Spanish, Polish and Nigerian migrants

Chapter:
(p.74) 3 Evidence of racial stratification in Ireland: comparing the labour market outcomes of Spanish, Polish and Nigerian migrants
Source:
Critical Race Theory and Inequality in the Labour Market
Author(s):

Ebun Joseph

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526134400.00009

This comparative chapter, which is a deviation from traditional ways of presenting data on discrimination and labour market differentials, converts statistical data to show the ways groups are racially stratified in the labour market. It provides evidence of racial stratification in Ireland by analysing the disparity in outcomes among migrant groups and how it is divided along racial lines. It utilises three main sources of data: a selected employability programme (EP) with a database of 639 unique individuals (N = 639); the Irish 2011 and 2016 national census statistics and various OECD reports of migrants’ outcomes in the EU; and data from 32 semi-structured interviews with first-generation migrants of Spanish, Polish and Nigerian descent. The conflating of nationality of descent and race in the society, coupled with the separation of White workers to paid labour and Black workers to unpaid labour, is also discussed.

Keywords:   Immigrants, Employment, Unpaid work, Inequality, Labour market, Migration

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