Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Geoffrey Hill's Later WorkRadiance of Apprehension$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alex Wylie

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526124944

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.7765/9781526124951

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

‘There are no demons’: faith and metaphysical desire

‘There are no demons’: faith and metaphysical desire

Chapter:
(p.77) Chapter 4 ‘There are no demons’: faith and metaphysical desire
Source:
Geoffrey Hill's Later Work
Author(s):

Alex Wylie

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526124951.00008

This chapter examines the relationship between belief and “metaphysical fantasy” as Hill conceives it in his later work. The chapter argues that such fantasy, or metaphysical desire as it is termed elsewhere in the book, is at the heart of Hill’s later conception of poetic energy and human values at large – and, fundamentally, that such a conception is a tortured and tortuous one. The influence of Gerard Manley Hopkins on the later work is discussed, and there is a further examination of Hill’s sense of the human will, this time in relation to the fall, drawing on such Christian thinkers as St Augustine, Martin Luther and Karl Barth. The chapter concludes with a consideration of Hill’s sense that reality is “like fiction”, and that the religious sense of his later work is fired by this difficult conclusion – difficult particularly for someone who rejects postmodern relativism.

Keywords:   Gerard Manley Hopkins, St Augustine, Karl Barth, St Paul, Will, The Fall, Alchemy, Mataphor

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.