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Marital Violence in Post-Independence Ireland, 1922-96'A Living Tomb for Women'$
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Cara Diver

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526120113

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.7765/9781526120120

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 27 May 2022

Marital violence as a social problem in post-independence Ireland, 1922–65

Marital violence as a social problem in post-independence Ireland, 1922–65

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 Marital violence as a social problem in post-independence Ireland, 1922–65
Source:
Marital Violence in Post-Independence Ireland, 1922-96
Author(s):

Cara Diver

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7765/9781526120120.00006

This chapter explores the ways in which marital violence was sanctioned and controlled through Irish culture during the years from 1922 to 1965. During this period, battered women had little refuge from violence. It was common for a chronically abused woman to remain with her violent husband because she had insufficient money to support herself (or her children) and little recourse to the law. Due to women’s inferior status, this chapter argues that marital violence represented a social problem in post-independence Ireland: an abused woman had a socially-constructed inability to escape her husband’s violence as a result of her economic dependence, limited legal options, and social and religious expectations.

Keywords:   Status of women, Female employment, Catholic social teaching, Marital violence and the law, Divorce, Social problem

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