Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Hurt(ful) BodyPerforming and Beholding Pain, 1600-1800$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Tomas Macsotay, Cornelis van der Haven, and Karel Vanhaesebrouck

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781784995164

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784995164.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The Massacre of the Innocents: infanticide and solace in the seventeenth-century Low Countries

The Massacre of the Innocents: infanticide and solace in the seventeenth-century Low Countries

Chapter:
(p.49) 2 The Massacre of the Innocents: infanticide and solace in the seventeenth-century Low Countries
Source:
The Hurt(ful) Body
Author(s):

Stijn Bussels

Bram Van Oostveldt

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784995164.003.0003

In this chapter a specific body will take centre-stage: the body of the child. Focusing on both theatre and visual arts in the Dutch Republic this contribution will discuss the most cruel and loathsome form of violence, i.e. violence inflicted on innocent children. For this, one passage from the Bible was often used, the massacre of the Innocents in Bethlehem from the Gospel of Matthew. This contribution concentrates on the popularity of this biblical passage in the visual arts of the early modern Netherlands and will clarify how diverse the solace can be. Therefore, this chapter will focus on the thirties of the seventeenth century, when the Dutch Republic had consolidated itself as a crucial economic and cultural player and when the Spanish Netherlands were dominated by counter-reformational discourses. Daniel Heinsius’s Latin tragedy Herodes infanticida (1632), an illustration from Jacob Cats’ Trov-ringh (1637), Rubens’ Massacre of the Innocents (1637) and Joost van de Vondel’s history play Gysbrecht van Aemstel (1638) will be discussed. A detailed comparative analysis of these examples will reveal how artists, writers, painters and actors, used hurt bodies on stage, page or canvas as a means to feature the most profound fears and doubts of an era.

Keywords:   Infanticide; Theatre; Dutch Republic; Solace

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.