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The Changing Spaces of Television ActingFrom Studio Realism to Location Realism in BBC Television Drama$
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Richard Hewett

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781784992989

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784992989.001.0001

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The genesis of location realism

The genesis of location realism

Chapter:
(p.117) 3 The genesis of location realism
Source:
The Changing Spaces of Television Acting
Author(s):

Richard Hewett

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784992989.003.0003

Just as studio realism reached its apotheosis in the 1970s, BBC television drama showed signs of moving away from the multi-camera practices of Television Centre and out onto location. While technologically primitive compared to the cameras used today, the early employment of Outside Broadcast videotape equipment for drama (as opposed to live sporting events) saw a move towards a less projected performance style, linked in turn to the gradual introduction in English drama schools of Constantin Stanislavski, whose influence in the UK had been signified a decade earlier by the opening of East 15 and the Drama Centre London. While training for television at drama academies remained minimal, this period saw the beginnings of the birth of location realism, whose emergence in Survivors was praised by contemporary viewers.

Keywords:   1970s, studio realism, multi-camera, location, Outside Broadcast, videotape, drama school, Stanislavski, location realism

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