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Turkish Immigration, Art and Narratives of Home in France$
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Annedith Schneider

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781784991494

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784991494.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

Politics and belonging in the music of Turkish-French rapper C-it

Politics and belonging in the music of Turkish-French rapper C-it

Chapter:
(p.28) 1 Politics and belonging in the music of Turkish-French rapper C-it
Source:
Turkish Immigration, Art and Narratives of Home in France
Author(s):

Annedith Schneider

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784991494.003.0002

This chapter examines the debates in France concerning communautarisme by analysing the work of rap musician C-it (Seyit Yakut). Communautarisme corresponds roughly to “identity politics,” but the emotional weight of this term is difficult to translate into English. For those who oppose any sort of political organizing along ethnic or religious lines, such as André Taguieff, communautarisme implies sectarian division of society and violates the spirit of equality inscribed in the constitution. Critics of this approach, such as Laurent Lévy, point out that ignoring race and other distinguishing factors does not make them go away and instead requires all members of the public to adhere to a pre-defined national norm. Rapper C-it might seem an unlikely example to counter concerns about identity politics. He performs primarily in Turkish for audiences made up of young people whose parents or grandparents emigrated from Turkey. This chapter argues, however, that despite his performances in Turkish, he and his audience see themselves as very much settled and a part of France.

Keywords:   Immigration, France, Rap music, Identity politics, Belonging, Minority language, Ethnicity, Neighborhood

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