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The Anxiety of Sameness In Early Modern Spain$
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Christina H. Lee

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781784991203

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784991203.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 12 November 2019

The forgery of nobility in literary texts

The forgery of nobility in literary texts

Chapter:
(p.47) 2 The forgery of nobility in literary texts
Source:
The Anxiety of Sameness In Early Modern Spain
Author(s):

Christina H. Lee

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784991203.003.0002

The literary texts Lee examines in “Chapter Two” involve scenarios in which hidalgos are threatened by lowborn passers determined to do them harm, and ultimately arrive to the felicitous conclusion that the established nobility prevails. These fictional narratives and dramas of lowborn passers allow the target reader or audience member to peek into the otherwise mysterious lives of these imagined impostors and proffer the false sense that s/he has an insight on the well-shielded secrets of their deceptive performances. Lee focuses on authors Alonso Jerónimo de Salas Barbadillo’s El caballero puntual, Diego de Hermosilla’s Diálogo de la vida de los pajes de palacio, Lope de Vega’s El caballero de milagro, Quevedo’s Historia de la vida del buscón llamado don Pablos, Alonso de Castillo Solórzano’s Teresa de Manzanares, and Vicente Espinel’s Relaciones de la vida del escudero Marcos de Obregón. She ends her discussion of social anxiety with an interpretation of the hidalgo hero in Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quijote as a figure who initially incarnates the anxiety of sameness and eventually conquers it.

Keywords:   Hidalgo, Hidalguia, Picaresque, Lope de Vega, Diego de Hermosilla, Alonso Jerónimo de Salas Barbadillo, Francisco de Quevedo, Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quijote de la Mancha, Social mobility, Envy

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