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Sport and diplomacyGames within games$
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Simon Rofe

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526131058

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526131058.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 31 July 2021

‘They used Americana, all painted and polished, to make the enormous impression they did’: selling the Reagan revolution through the 1984 Olympic Games1

‘They used Americana, all painted and polished, to make the enormous impression they did’: selling the Reagan revolution through the 1984 Olympic Games1

Chapter:
(p.223) 12 ‘They used Americana, all painted and polished, to make the enormous impression they did’: selling the Reagan revolution through the 1984 Olympic Games1
Source:
Sport and diplomacy
Author(s):

Umberto Tulli

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526131058.003.0013

The chapter aims at investigating the role of the Reagan administration in organizing the Games. Contrary to previous understanding, which tend to dismiss federal government involvment in the organization of the Games, it will highlight the political and diplomatic actions undertaken by the Reagan administration to organize a perfect edition of the Olympics and to sell the world reaganism through the Los Angeles Games. Since the creation of an Olympic task force within the White House, the Los Angeles Games were perceived as a showcase on Ronald Reagan's America. The task force immediately concluded that the federal government would act behind the scenes, providing all the necessary security measures for the LAOOC and the Games, coordinating diplomatic actions and looking over consular practices. Tasks increased when the Soviets announced their boycott: the White House defined a clear damage-limiting strategy. In its conclusions, the chapter will discuss a sort of paradox: the Reagan administration was increasingly involved in the promotion of what it presented as a government-free edition of the Olympics.

Keywords:   1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games, President Ronald Reagan, Olympic boycott, US-Soviet Relations, International Olympic Committee

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