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Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice$
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Chiara Certoma, Susan Noori, and Martin Sondermann

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526126092

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Food for all? Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK

Food for all? Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK

Chapter:
(p.139) 9 Food for all? Critically evaluating the role of the Incredible Edible movement in the UK
Source:
Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Author(s):

Michael Hardman

Mags Adams

Melissa Barker

Luke Beesley

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.003.0009

With the concept of Urban Agriculture (UA) growing in popularity, more cities and towns are exploring opportunities to enable the practice and transform neglected spaces into havens for produce. This chapter provides an insight into one such town, Todmorden and its Incredible Edible movement, located in the heart of England. This chapter adopts a qualitative approach to critically exploring the IET movement and to understand its impact on Todmorden. We engaged with key actors and the public in order to ascertain views towards the schemes, analysing the positives and negatives of the model. Findings revealed that the scheme has an overwhelmingly positive impact on the town, with social, environmental and economic benefits. Furthermore, it was made clear that IET is helping to create a more just food movement in Todmorden, particularly through its free for all philosophy. However, some negatives were also highlighted during the course of the research, predominately around maintenance issues and a lack of perceived inclusivity in parts. Overall, the scheme was highly valued and seen as a powerful method for growing the wider UA movement; recommendations centred on further replicating the model and helping local food to prosper in similar locations globally.

Keywords:   Urban Agriculture, local food, food justice, food sovereignty, Incredible Edible

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