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Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice$
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Chiara Certoma, Susan Noori, and Martin Sondermann

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526126092

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Community gardening for integrated urban renewal in Copenhagen: securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

Community gardening for integrated urban renewal in Copenhagen: securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

Chapter:
(p.91) 6 Community gardening for integrated urban renewal in Copenhagen: securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?
Source:
Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Author(s):

Parama Roy

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.003.0006

This chapter presents a case study from Copenhagen on a community-based, but state-initiated urban gardening effort to examine what such efforts mean for the minorities’ (the homeless and the ethnic minorities’) right to the city (Purcell, 2002; 2013) especially within the context of a traditionally welfare-driven, but increasingly neoliberalized urban context. David Harvey has described the right to the city as “not merely a right of access to what already exists, but a right to change it after our heart’s desire” (Harvey, 2003). As such, in this chapter the concept of “right to the city” is operationalized as a measure or proxy for social and spatial justice to explore how the state-initiated community gardening effort in the Sundholm District shapes/secures/denies the homeless and the ethnic minorities’ ability to, a) use and just be in the physical space of the garden (a public space) and b) to translate this into access to the political space of urban governance (and governance of the garden space) where they can voice their needs/concerns.

Keywords:   Community gardening, neoliberalism, right to the city, homeless, ethnic minorities

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