Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Chiara Certoma, Susan Noori, and Martin Sondermann

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526126092

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Temporary urban landscapes and urban gardening: re-inventing open space in Greece and Switzerland

Temporary urban landscapes and urban gardening: re-inventing open space in Greece and Switzerland

Chapter:
(p.59) 4 Temporary urban landscapes and urban gardening: re-inventing open space in Greece and Switzerland
Source:
Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Author(s):

Sofia Nikolaidou

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526126092.003.0004

New forms of urban gardening are gaining a momentum in cities transforming the conventional use and functions of open green and public space. They often take place through informal and temporary (re)use of vacant land consisting part of greening strategies or social inclusion policy through new modes of land use management, green space governance and collaborative practices. Particular emphasis is placed on shifted meanings of the notion of open public space by referring to its openness to a diversity of uses and users that claim it and relates to the questions of access rights, power relations among actors, negotiations and the so called right to use and re-appropriate land. By using examples drawn from the Greek and Swiss case, this chapter underlines differences and similarities in urban gardening practices, social and institutional contexts, collaborative governance patterns, motivations, levels of institutionalisation, openness and inclusiveness of space. More specifically it calls attention to the critical role of the temporary nature of these initiatives in relation to their multifunctional, spatial and socio-political aspects that affect new configurations of urban green areas and public space as well as related planning practices.

Keywords:   Urban gardening, open public space, urban greening, spatial justice, urban resilience, social inclusion, collaborative governance, vacant land, Greece, Switzerland

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.