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The 'desegregation' of English schoolsBussing, race and urban space, 1960s-80s$
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Olivier Esteves

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526124852

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526124852.001.0001

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Dispersing in diverse places: how the other LEAs fared

Dispersing in diverse places: how the other LEAs fared

Chapter:
(p.120) 5 Dispersing in diverse places: how the other LEAs fared
Source:
The 'desegregation' of English schools
Author(s):

Olivier Esteves

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526124852.003.0006

This chapter analyses the different forms that dispersal took in the Local Education Authorities that introduced it besides Ealing (Southall) and Bradford. Blackburn presented a specific case in the sense that multiracial neighbourhoods were often situated near voluntary-aided schools, either Anglican or Roman Catholic. The problem was compounded by the activism of the National Front locally. Huddersfield and Halifax presented more ordinary cases, like West Bromwich, although in Huddersfield and West Bromwich the large proportion of (Anglophone) West Indian pupils made dispersal look more like an anomaly. Halifax put an end to bussing only in 1986–87. In Leicester, it was only the sudden influx of Ugandan Asians in 1972–73 which made the local authorities reluctantly introduce dispersal. In Bristol, the form dispersal took was radically different from elsewhere, and barely deserves the name. Lastly, the local situations of Wolverhampton, Walsall, Smethwick, Hounslow, Luton, Croydon and Dewsbury are presented.

Keywords:   Voluntary-aided schools, National Front, White Backlash, Ugandan Asians, West Indians

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