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Battle-scarredMortality, medical care and military welfare in the British Civil Wars$
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David Appleby and Andrew Hopper

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526124807

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526124807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 05 August 2021

Controlling disease in a civil-war garrison town: military discipline or civic duty? The surviving evidence for Newark-upon-Trent, 1642–46

Controlling disease in a civil-war garrison town: military discipline or civic duty? The surviving evidence for Newark-upon-Trent, 1642–46

Chapter:
(p.40) Chapter 2 Controlling disease in a civil-war garrison town: military discipline or civic duty? The surviving evidence for Newark-upon-Trent, 1642–46
Source:
Battle-scarred
Author(s):

Stuart B. Jennings

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526124807.003.0003

Across England, between 1642 and 1648, numerous towns found themselves garrisoned. Whilst some issues were clearly military matters, relationships between civic authorities and garrison commanders over more generic matters often proved to be fraught. One such issue where responsibility was unclear was in the response to the arrival of endemic disease, such as typhus or plague, which impacted on all in a garrison town and where a degree of coordinated action was required to limit the spread of infection: who took charge, how and where were the infected treated and quarantined and who met the cost (both financial and logistical) in such situations? A rare survival of civilian sources from the town of Newark enables an exploration of some of the issues within this garrison town.

Keywords:   towns, garrisons, typhus, plague, soldiers, civilians

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