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Margaret HarknessWriting social engagement 1880-1921$
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Flore Janssen and Lisa Robertson

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781526123503

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526123503.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

‘The problem of leisure/what to do for pleasure’: women and leisure time in A City Girl (1887) and In Darkest London (1891)

‘The problem of leisure/what to do for pleasure’: women and leisure time in A City Girl (1887) and In Darkest London (1891)

Chapter:
(p.74) 4 ‘The problem of leisure/what to do for pleasure’: women and leisure time in A City Girl (1887) and In Darkest London (1891)
Source:
Margaret Harkness
Author(s):

Eliza Cubitt

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526123503.003.0005

This chapter places the leisure pursuits of female characters in Harkness’s fiction in a broader context of gendered cultural anxieties about working-class leisure activities in the late nineteenth century. Focusing on two of Harkness’s novels, A City Girl and In Darkest London, it argues that, for working women in Harkness’s fiction, leisure may be difficult to access and often becomes another form of work. Comparing Harkness’s characters to women in other contemporary texts such as Liza of Lambeth, it shows how leisure pursuits often reflect and reproduce social dangers and structures of oppression for unmarried working-class women.

Keywords:   Leisure, Pleasure, A City Girl, In Darkest London, Cultural anxieties, Work, Working-class women

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