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Migration Into ArtTranscultural Identities and Art-Making in a Globalised World$
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Anne Ring Petersen

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526121905

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526121905.001.0001

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The politics of identity and recognition in the ‘global art world’

The politics of identity and recognition in the ‘global art world’

Chapter:
(p.64) 2 The politics of identity and recognition in the ‘global art world’
Source:
Migration Into Art
Author(s):

Anne Ring Petersen

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526121905.003.0003

Questions of cultural identity and the status of non-Western artists in the West have been important to the discourses on the interrelations between contemporary art, migration and globalisation for at least two decades. Chapter 2 considers the connections between the critical discourse on cultural identity, the globalisation of the art world and the adoption of multicultural policies by Western art institutions. It critically engages with the British discourse on ‘New Internationalism’ in the 1990s as well as the wider and more recent discourse on ‘global art’. It is argued that discussions from the last twenty-five years have not only made it clear that institutional multiculturalism is not the answer to the challenge of attaining genuine recognition of non-Western artists in the West, but also revealed that the critical discourse on identity politics has not been able to come up with solutions, either. In fact, it is marred by the same binary thinking and mechanisms of exclusion that it aims to deconstruct. Chapter 2 concludes with two suggestions to how we can get beyond the deadlock of the critical discourse on identity politics.

Keywords:   identity politics, recognition, multiculturalism, institutional critique, the art world, global art, New Internationalism

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