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The Advocacy TrapTransnational Activism and State Power in China$
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Stephen Noakes

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526119476

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526119476.001.0001

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Reading the ‘lay of the land’: intercessory advocacy and causal process in the HIV/AIDS treatment and death penalty abolitionist campaigns

Reading the ‘lay of the land’: intercessory advocacy and causal process in the HIV/AIDS treatment and death penalty abolitionist campaigns

Chapter:
(p.70) 3 Reading the ‘lay of the land’: intercessory advocacy and causal process in the HIV/AIDS treatment and death penalty abolitionist campaigns
Source:
The Advocacy Trap
Author(s):

Stephen Noakes

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526119476.003.0004

The cases presented in this chapter—those to improve care for the HIV positive and to abolish capital punishment—jointly call attention to the need to pay close attention to sequence and causal force in TAN campaigns. The HIV/AIDS campaign is an example of ‘intercessory advocacy,’ in which a campaign seized upon an opportunity to play a role in a state-led effort to improve treatment programs. By packaging its message in a manner palatable to the state, it was able to play a role in crafting China’s emergent anti-HV strategy. The campaign to abolish capital punishment, on the other hand, exercised very little effect on China’s much publicized effort to reduce reliance of on the death penalty. Rather, the scaling back of the death penalty is driven mostly by domestic political considerations, namely a desire to retain the practice of capital punishment for purposes of crime control while simultaneously strengthening the rule of law by introducing greater accountability into the death penalty process through the highly publicized policy of ‘kill fewer, kill carefully.’

Keywords:   Causality, HIV/AIDS, NGOs, China, Death penalty, Capital Punishment

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