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The Advocacy TrapTransnational Activism and State Power in China$
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Stephen Noakes

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526119476

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526119476.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 12 July 2020

The power of state preferences: the ‘natural cases’ of the campaigns for Falun Gong and IPR protection

The power of state preferences: the ‘natural cases’ of the campaigns for Falun Gong and IPR protection

Chapter:
(p.38) 2 The power of state preferences: the ‘natural cases’ of the campaigns for Falun Gong and IPR protection
Source:
The Advocacy Trap
Author(s):

Stephen Noakes

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526119476.003.0003

This chapter is constituted by a systematic exploration of two transnational advocacy campaigns targeting the Chinese state: the search for justice on behalf of the Falun Gong religious movement, banned in China since 1999, and the transnational push to strengthen intellectual property rights in the PRC. In terms of results, these campaigns turned out completely differently. While the IPR protection campaign was welcomed by China’s leaders and witnessed the creation of an extensive if somewhat ineffectual set of institutions geared towards more rigorous enforcement, the campaign for Falun Gong received no such reception, and has not been countenanced in any form by the national government, save for its ongoing effort to exterminate the group from the Chinese mainland. Despite these disparate results, however, both of these cases reflect a pattern of ‘natural’ causality, as neither was incentivized to alter its original mission or message.

Keywords:   Falun Gong, Intellectual property, Rights, China, State

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