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Local antiquities, local identitiesArt, literature and antiquarianism in Europe, c. 1400–1700$
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Kathleen Christian and Bianca de Divitiis

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526117045

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526117045.001.0001

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A local sense of the past: spolia, reuse and all’antica building in southern Italy, 1400–16001

A local sense of the past: spolia, reuse and all’antica building in southern Italy, 1400–16001

Chapter:
(p.79) 4 A local sense of the past: spolia, reuse and all’antica building in southern Italy, 1400–16001
Source:
Local antiquities, local identities
Author(s):

Bianca de Divitiis

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526117045.003.0005

Between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries some of the most conspicuous remains of antiquity in the Italian peninsula were found in the Kingdom of Naples. These included not only Roman ruins, but also pre-Roman ones, such as Greek and, Italic relics, which testified to the diverse and very ancient origins of many of its centres. Magnificent ruins, such as temples or tombs, marked the landscape of cities and countryside and were regarded as traces of a glorious local past. Ancient remains were, furthermore, constantly unearthed across southern Italy either through chance findings or as a result of purposeful excavation and antiquarian research. Examining literary and artistic evidence, this essay considers local antiquity as a central theme of Southern Italian antiquarianism, for example in Capua and Venosa. It will also question the nature and perception of a diverse body of Southern Italian ‘antiquities’, which could include medieval monuments, imported classical works, or forgeries.

Keywords:   Renaissance Southern Italy, The Kingdom of Naples, Capua, Venosa

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