Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Local antiquities, local identitiesArt, literature and antiquarianism in Europe, c. 1400–1700$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kathleen Christian and Bianca de Divitiis

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526117045

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526117045.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

The Arch of Trajan in Ancona and civic identity in the Italian Quattrocento from Ciriaco d’Ancona to the death of Matthias Corvinus1

The Arch of Trajan in Ancona and civic identity in the Italian Quattrocento from Ciriaco d’Ancona to the death of Matthias Corvinus1

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 The Arch of Trajan in Ancona and civic identity in the Italian Quattrocento from Ciriaco d’Ancona to the death of Matthias Corvinus1
Source:
Local antiquities, local identities
Author(s):

Francesco Benelli

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526117045.003.0003

This essay offers new insights into the civic value and the reception of the Arch of Trajan for Renaissance architecture in Ancona, a city almost completely overlooked by Renaissance historiography because of the destruction of most of its buildings. Built in 115 AD the Arch was meant to celebrate the Emperor’s victory in the Dacian wars, whose fleet departed from Ancona. Looking to sources to be found outside of the city it is possible to examine the legacy of the arch – a monument praised by Sebastiano Serlio and Andrea Palladio, among others -‐ in public and religious architecture, as well as its role in creating the identity of the city. Some motifs from the arch appear already in Giorgio da Sebenico’s late Gothic church portals of S. Agostino and S. Francesco alle Scale, as well as in the Loggia dei Mercanti (late 1450’s, early 1460’s), but its first important depiction is by Pinturicchio in the Piccolomini library in Siena. Here the arch is placed adjacent to Pius II’s, celebrating the (failed) departure of the fifth crusade from Ancona’s harbour in 1464 as a neo-Trajanic enterprise.

Keywords:   Arch of Trajan at Ancona, Italian Renaissance architecture, Renaissance Ancona, Giorgio da Sebenico, Loggia dei Mercanti, Piccolomini Library in Siena, Pinturicchio, Ciriaco d’Ancona, Matthias Corvinus

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.