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Migrants of the British Diaspora Since the 1960sStories From Modern Nomads$
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A. James Hammerton

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781526116574

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526116574.001.0001

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Family, love, marriage and migration: the push and pull of private life

Family, love, marriage and migration: the push and pull of private life

Chapter:
(p.161) 6 Family, love, marriage and migration: the push and pull of private life
Source:
Migrants of the British Diaspora Since the 1960s
Author(s):

A. James Hammerton

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526116574.003.0007

This chapter explores ways in which the dynamics of love, marriage and family have shaped experiences and stories voiced by modern migrants. It focuses on the darker and brighter sides of migration and private life, where twin influences of migration and emotionally driven events are difficult to disentangle. These cases provide stark evidence of how modern migration became more discretionary, facilitating decisions to change countries for love – or for loss of love. Even the darker stories suggest migration could provide relief from the pain of family breakdown and divorce possibly due to resilience born of the challenges of adaptation to new countries. Transnational child custody cases and the complications of transnational marriages add further dimensions of complexity. Stories of close-knit but fractured families across three countries, with complex emotional histories, reveal equally complex understandings of the idea of ‘home’ as sanctuary, which owes something to changing attitudes to mobility. The final section, ‘Making the heart grow fonder: transnational love stories’, explores two women’s accounts in which emotions drove transnational love stories in striking ways, one over nearly half a century. All the stories mark a new trend of discretionary migration in an age of affluence.

Keywords:   private life, love, family breakdown, divorce, adaptation, child custody, transnational marriage, home, transnational love stories, discretionary migration

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