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Inequality and Democratic EgalitarianismMarx's Economy and Beyond and Other Essays$
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Mark Harvey and Norman Geras

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526114020

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526114020.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Coercive Capitalisms: Politico-economies of Slavery, Indentured Labour and Debt Peonage

Coercive Capitalisms: Politico-economies of Slavery, Indentured Labour and Debt Peonage

Chapter:
(p.130) 5 Coercive Capitalisms: Politico-economies of Slavery, Indentured Labour and Debt Peonage
Source:
Inequality and Democratic Egalitarianism
Author(s):

Mark Harvey

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526114020.003.0005

As a complement to the previous chapter, based on current scholarship and debates, this chapter demonstrates how deeply entwined slavery was with the development of industrial capitalism. Moreover, thriving slave economies were succeeded by new forms of bonded and unfree labour, rather than free wage labour, through to the middle of the 20th century. It argues that there is no purely economic incompatibility between capitalism and slavery, including in the present day. Only political struggles and new moralities replaced old forms of economic and power inequalities with the persistent inequalities of the present day. The chapter analyses the epistemological suppression of slavery and coerced labour within classical and modern economic conceptions of the abstract market economy.

Keywords:   Slavery, Coerced labour, Abstract market economy, Hybrid economies

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