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Image OperationsVisual media and political conflict$
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Jens Eder and Charlotte Klonk

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781526107213

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526107213.001.0001

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Images of the world, images of conflict

Images of the world, images of conflict

Chapter:
(p.25) 1 Images of the world, images of conflict
Source:
Image Operations
Author(s):

Ben O’Loughlin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526107213.003.0002

In the short story Pascale’s Sphere Borges wrote, ‘universal history is the history of a few metaphors’. The history of world politics certainly seems marked by a few recurring concepts and metaphors: the universal and the particular, the inside and the outside, the balance of power, and the ideal of symmetry and actuality of chaos. Across eras, these concepts have shaped the image of world politics held by leaders, citizens and scholars. Such concepts are abstract but become visualised through diplomacy, war and cartography and through the lived experience of world affairs. For critical scholars of International Relations, these concepts and the images they translate into are responsible for conflict, for they become concrete in the states, borders and security dilemmas that propel us from conflict to conflict. It follows that there is a relationship between ‘the image of world politics’ and actual visual images of world politics; between abstract, conceptual understandings of the ontology and mechanics of International Relations and the horrific news and events we witness every day.

Keywords:   Image of world politics, Conceptual metaphors, Body and kinship metaphors, Diplomacy, International relations

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