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Tracing the Cultural Legacy of Irish CatholicismFrom Galway to Cloyne and Beyond$
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Eamon Maher and Eugene O'Brien

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781526101068

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526101068.001.0001

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Faith, hope and clarity? A new church for the unhoused

Faith, hope and clarity? A new church for the unhoused

Chapter:
(p.163) 10 Faith, hope and clarity? A new church for the unhoused
Source:
Tracing the Cultural Legacy of Irish Catholicism
Author(s):

Michael Cronin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526101068.003.0011

Michael Cronin opens this chapter by observing that the greatest threat to Irish society has been the dominant discourse of neo-liberalism and the Market, which has come to be the deity to which all must bend. The Irish Church has traditionally been associated with a regime of fear and punishment, which is somewhat paradoxical given that the founding message of Christianity is one of hope, of the end of fear. In Cronin’s view, a more radical move for a Church, which has been brought to its knees by a multiplicity of cultural factors, would be to embrace empathy and a politics of hope, which might consist of no longer saying ‘No’, but ‘Yes’. The affirmation of justice for all, a more equal sharing of wealth, the creation of a climate where difference is embraced, these are the life-affirming and Christian principles on which the future of Irish Catholicism should be based.

Keywords:   Neo-liberalism, Market, Sharing of wealth, Embracing difference

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