Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Men in reserveBritish civilian masculinites in the Second World War$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Juliette Pattinson, Arthur McIvor, and Linsey Robb

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781526100696

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526100696.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

Men in reserve: recovering the civilian man

Men in reserve: recovering the civilian man

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Men in reserve: recovering the civilian man
Source:
Men in reserve
Author(s):

Juliette Pattinson

Arthur Mcivor

Linsey Robb

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526100696.003.0001

The chapter examines the consensus among historians that civilian men were compared unfavourably to the disciplined soldier, were emasculated by women’s new wartime roles and were rendered invisible in wartime representations. Having established the high status enjoyed by the ‘soldier hero’ in wartime discourse and by contrast, the fragile position of the male civilian, with reference to Connell’s concept of ‘hegemonic masculinity’, the chapter asserts that the construction of masculinity in fact remained open to contestation. Sources where the reserved man are depicted in a positive way are analysed. The chapter examines the rich array of source material that historians can, but have so far failed to, draw upon, including archival documents, visual sources and our newly conducted oral history interviews.

Keywords:   Masculinities, ‘hegemonic masculinity’, Emasculation, ‘Soldier Hero’

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.