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Byron and Italy$
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Alan Rawes and Diego Saglia

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781526100559

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526100559.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 15 September 2019

‘Where shall I turn me?’: Italy and irony in Beppo and Don Juan

‘Where shall I turn me?’: Italy and irony in Beppo and Don Juan

Chapter:
(p.208) 11 ‘Where shall I turn me?’: Italy and irony in Beppo and Don Juan
Source:
Byron and Italy
Author(s):

Diego Saglia

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526100559.003.0012

This chapter focuses on Byron’s ‘Italian’ satires, Beppo and Don Juan, as well as the late prose fragment ‘An Italian Carnival’. It begins by highlighting Byron’s parabasic ‘turn’ to Italy in these works in order to argue that the poet’s complex and contradictory self-positioning in Italy, during his years there, underpins the unprecedentedly multiform poetics and world view of these texts. The chapter begins by examining the ambivalences and contradictions in Don Juan’s references to Pulci, Ariosto, Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio, showing the extent to which Italy’s literature contributes to, but is also subverted by, Byron’s constructing of his new ‘medley mode’. Turning to Beppo, the chapter considers the ways in which the figure of the cavalier servente offers the poet a crucially performative model for his Italian ‘turn’ and the parabasic nature of his satires. The chapter concludes by examining Byron’s reprise of this mode in ‘An Italian Carnival’ to delineatea final image and assessment of the country.

Keywords:   Beppo, Don Juan, ‘An Italian Carnival’, Italian literature, Satire, Irony, Parabasis, Performance, Cavalier servente

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