Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The existential drinker$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven Earnshaw

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780719099618

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719099618.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

William Kennedy, Ironweed (1983): fugitive souls and free spirits

William Kennedy, Ironweed (1983): fugitive souls and free spirits

Chapter:
(p.197) 10 William Kennedy, Ironweed (1983): fugitive souls and free spirits
Source:
The existential drinker
Author(s):

Steven Earnshaw

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719099618.003.0011

This chapter is the first in the final section of The Existential Drinker, and notes that while the novel has many features of an Existential drinker text, it is also beginning to look to other ways of representing characters who commit to drinking. Although the novel is set in Depression-Era America its portrayal of down-and-outs in Albany is implicitly a counterblast to the greed of the 1980s. It has identifiable Existential elements, but these compete with other responses to the puzzle of existence, including a kind of spiritual comportment to the world which overlaps with some of the religious (Catholic) aspects of the book, and an occasional deterministic outlook. As well as the central character, Francis Phelan, the chapter also gives due consideration to his sometime girlfriend Helen, who lives in an arguably more wholehearted Existential manner than Francis.

Keywords:   William Kennedy, Ironweed, free will, alienation, Catholicism

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.