Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Writing the history of parliament in Tudor and early Stuart England$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Cavill and Alexandra Gajda

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780719099588

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719099588.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

‘That memorable parliament’: medieval history in parliamentarian polemic, 1641–42

‘That memorable parliament’: medieval history in parliamentarian polemic, 1641–42

Chapter:
(p.194) Chapter 9 ‘That memorable parliament’: medieval history in parliamentarian polemic, 1641–42
Source:
Writing the history of parliament in Tudor and early Stuart England
Author(s):

Jason Peacey

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719099588.003.0009

This essay examines how England’s medieval parliamentary history – from Henry III to Henry IV – was deployed for polemical purposes in the months surrounding the outbreak of the Civil Wars. In particular, the aim is to both acknowledge and move beyond the ‘baronial context’ of the English Civil Wars, in which reflections on medieval history were used to justify a form of ‘parliamentarian’ rhetoric that afforded the peerage a decisive role. By examining a range of neglected popular pamphlets that appeared in print during the months leading up to conflict, the essay demonstrates instead how evidence relating to the fourteenth century began to be used to reflect on parliamentary power and on the House of Commons, and to discuss the possibility of deposing and executing ‘unprofitable’ kings and of electing and binding their successors. Attention is drawn to an important shift in parliamentarian rhetoric regarding the king and parliament. It is argued that the treatment of medieval parliaments reveals incipient political radicalism in the opening weeks and months of the Civil Wars.

Keywords:   English Civil Wars, Henry III, Richard II, Henry IV, pamphlets, baronial context, radicalism, House of Commons

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.