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Tolerance and Diversity In Ireland, North and South$
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Iseult Honohan and Nathalie Rougier

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780719097201

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719097201.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

‘When you actually talk to them …’ –recognising and respecting cultural and religious diversity in Irish schools

‘When you actually talk to them …’ –recognising and respecting cultural and religious diversity in Irish schools

Chapter:
(p.17) 1 ‘When you actually talk to them …’ –recognising and respecting cultural and religious diversity in Irish schools
Source:
Tolerance and Diversity In Ireland, North and South
Author(s):

Merike Darmody

Emer Smyth

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719097201.003.0002

Large scale and rapid immigration to Ireland has significantly changed the face of the country. Recent Census figures show that, despite the economic recession, migration to Ireland is continuing, albeit at a slower pace. In addition, contrary to popular belief, many migrants have decided to make Ireland their home and have applied for citizenship. Cultural and religious diversity has become a lived reality in the country. Schools have an important part to play in educating young people how to develop strategies for living in a more diverse society, in accepting and respecting difference. This chapter reports on data gathered for two research projects dealing with cultural and religious diversity in the Irish education system. It discusses measures Irish primary and second level schools have put in place to cater for diversity in the student body and explores to what extent Irish and migrant students have developed a better understanding of each other’s social worlds – leading to an acceptance of difference and changing stereotypes.

Keywords:   Education, Diversity, Migration, Ireland, Acceptance

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