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Protest and the Politics of Space and Place, 1789-1848$
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Katrina Navickas

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719097058

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719097058.001.0001

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Constructing new spaces

Constructing new spaces

Chapter:
(p.189) 6 Constructing new spaces
Source:
Protest and the Politics of Space and Place, 1789-1848
Author(s):

Katrina Navickas

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719097058.003.0006

With greater longevity and funding than their predecessors, radicals were able to move beyond ‘spaces of making do’. This chapter examines how Owenite socialists, Chartists, trades unions and the other social movements that emerged in the 1830s hired or constructed detached buildings for their sole use. These sites of meeting functioned not just for immediate campaigns, but for longer visionary goals. These were spaces to enact an alternative economy, a freer religion, an egalitarian education and for entertainment. Association rooms, working-men’s clubs and halls of science reflected a holistic view of how politics should shape communities and their everyday life. These sites faced financial difficulties and the opposition of local elites, but nevertheless offered a new definition of public space.

Keywords:   Halls of Science, Owenite socialism, Chartism, Public space, Buildings

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