Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
No SolutionThe Labour Government and the Northern Ireland Conflict, 1974-79$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

S.C. Aveyard

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719096402

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719096402.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

The evolution of the long war

The evolution of the long war

Chapter:
(p.220) 10 The evolution of the long war
Source:
No Solution
Author(s):

S.C. Aveyard

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719096402.003.0011

After the ceasefire the Provisional IRA was in disarray and it struggled because of increased attrition by British security forces. In response, just as the Labour government adapted to the long haul ahead by formulating the policies of police primacy and criminalisation, republicans fashioned a ‘long war’ strategy which formed the basis of their armed struggle for the rest of the conflict. Sections of the Northern Ireland Office began to appreciate that the conflict would persist over a number of years because of the PIRA’s ability to adapt to the new conditions. Pressures from the British army to revert to a more aggressive stance persisted and there was growing evidence that senior officers were only paying lip service to the Labour government’s strategy. There were also a number of controversies over SAS operations, the growing protest in the prisons and interrogation techniques used by the RUC. Each of these illustrates the limitations on attempts to drive a wedge between the Provisional IRA and the nationalist community.

Keywords:   Provisional IRA, British army, Royal Ulster Constabulary, Long war, Criminalisation, Prison protests, Interrogation

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.