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Everyday Security ThreatsPerceptions, Experiences, and Consequences$
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Daniel Stevens and Nick Vaughan-Williams

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719096068

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719096068.001.0001

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The scope of security threats and their causes

The scope of security threats and their causes

Chapter:
(p.64) 3 The scope of security threats and their causes
Source:
Everyday Security Threats
Author(s):

Daniel Stevens

Nick Vaughan-Williams

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719096068.003.0004

Chapter Three brings together insights from the focus group and survey data on the scope of threats and their origins. It debunks previous claims that there are few systematic influences on threats and goes further in clarifying the variation in the origins of different threats at different levels. It begins by summarising how participants in group discussions defined and understood the key concepts of ‘security’ and ‘threat’, and the vernacular methods of perception, measurement and categories of understanding of security. The Chapter shows a recurring scale of understanding consisting of four primary levels –personal, community, national, and global. From the survey data, it focuses initially on the breadth, or number, of security threats that individuals identified in total at the global, national, community, and personal levels. It also examines what those threats were. The second part of the Chapter analyses the specific threats of terrorism, immigration, the economy, and the environment. Among the findings is that mortality salience and authoritarian attitudes are strong predictors of the number of threats that individuals identify and on the identification of specific threats such as terrorism and immigration.

Keywords:   Threat, Security, Vernacular, Terrorism, Immigration, Economy, Environment, Mortality salience, Authoritarianism

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