Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Apostasy and Jewish identity in high Middle Ages Northern Europe'Are you still my brother?'$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Goldin Simha

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719095771

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719095771.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Self-definition and halakhah

Self-definition and halakhah

Chapter:
(p.52) 4 Self-definition and halakhah
Source:
Apostasy and Jewish identity in high Middle Ages Northern Europe
Author(s):

Simha Goldin

Jonathan Chipman

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719095771.003.0004

The Jew who remained a Jew was obliged to define his attitude towards the Jew who converted to Christianity, and indeed this had to be done in many spheres. The halakhah had laid down in principle the decision that a Jew who converted to Christianity was still, despite everything, a brother and a Jew, but this decision was eroded over time. The Rabbinic authorities were being asked Halakhic questions such as: is a convert regarded as a dead person or not? What happens in the case of the wife of a convert who remains Jewish? Can a convert bequeath or inherit possessions? Is the wine he produces “the wine of non-Jews” (that Jews were forbidden to drink)? What is the law applying to those who converted to Christianity and later returned to Judaism? Can they be trusted? Do they have to undergo immersion, like converts to Judaism?

Keywords:   Halakhah, Law, Conversion, Judaism, Self-definition

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.