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"Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939-45"The utility dream palace$
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Richard Farmer

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091889

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091889.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
"Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939-45"
Author(s):

Richard Farmer

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091889.003.0008

Cinemas were, for tens of millions of Britons each week, an element of everyday life, and cinemagoing was a cultural and experiential activity that was at once exciting and mundane. Changes to pre-established ideals of cinemagoing were, therefore, significant; popular reactions to such changes, which were used by bodies such as the Metropolitan Police to gauge morale, no less so. Establishing the parameters of the study, the introduction also, explains the varying meanings of the word ‘utility’, from which the book takes its title’ and provides an overview of the British exhibition industry in 1939 in order that the changes that occurred during the war can be understood in their proper context.

Keywords:   Cinemagoing, Cinemas, Experiential, May 1940, Utility, Pre-war ideal, Morale

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