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Developing AfricaConcepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism$
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Joseph M. Hodge, Gerald Hödl, and Martina Kopf

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091803

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.001.0001

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The ‘private’ face of African development planning during the Second World War1

The ‘private’ face of African development planning during the Second World War1

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter Four The ‘private’ face of African development planning during the Second World War1
Source:
Developing Africa
Author(s):

Billy Frank

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.003.0005

In 1942, Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas) launched an essay competition for its staff on the subject of “The Bank in relation to post-war colonial development”. This “knowledge management” exercise evinces an interesting insight into capitalist concerns and ideas in relation to colonial economic development and colonial administration in British Africa during the Second World War. The essays made numerous proposals: ideas to extend banking facilities for indigenous populations, better support for local business and agriculture, the extension of co-operative farming methods, changes to education policy in Britain's African colonies, the creation of a permanent economic staff in colonial governments, and the future federation of certain African colonies. The arguments advanced by the essayists are a significant and underused historical source. Frank seeks to place them in the historical context of the wider efforts by the imperial government to plan for post-war colonial development.

Keywords:   Barclays Bank (Dominion, Colonial and Overseas), British colonial Africa, Colonial Bank, Colonial business, Colonial administration, Economic development, Private finance, Post-war colonial development

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