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Developing AfricaConcepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism$
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Joseph M. Hodge, Gerald Hödl, and Martina Kopf

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091803

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.001.0001

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Motherhood, morality, and social order: gender and development discourse and practice in late colonial Africa

Motherhood, morality, and social order: gender and development discourse and practice in late colonial Africa

Chapter:
(p.270) Chapter Eleven Motherhood, morality, and social order: gender and development discourse and practice in late colonial Africa
Source:
Developing Africa
Author(s):

Barbara Bush

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.003.0012

This chapter charts the evolution of development discourse as a gendered discourse. It examines the links between this gendered discourse and the development of the colonial economy and strategies to order, control, manage and discipline African men and women as social and economic change accelerated in the late colonial era. The author demonstrates how representations of African gender identities and relations, domesticity, and sexuality permeated colonial concepts and practices of development. She adopts a dual focus: the implications for practice relating to representations of African women in colonial development discourse, and the contribution European women made to the evolution of such discourse and practice. The author focuses mainly on British colonial concepts and practices but as the major colonial powers differed little in their perceptions of African gender roles and relations the themes she develops have broader relevance.

Keywords:   Development discourse, Colonial economy, Domesticity, Gender identities, African women, European women, British colonialism, Sexuality, African gender roles

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