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Developing AfricaConcepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism$
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Joseph M. Hodge, Gerald Hödl, and Martina Kopf

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091803

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.001.0001

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‘Keystone of progress’ and mise en valeur d'ensemble: British and French colonial discourses on education for development in the interwar period

‘Keystone of progress’ and mise en valeur d'ensemble: British and French colonial discourses on education for development in the interwar period

Chapter:
(p.222) Chapter Nine ‘Keystone of progress’ and mise en valeur d'ensemble: British and French colonial discourses on education for development in the interwar period
Source:
Developing Africa
Author(s):

Walter Schicho

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091803.003.0010

This chapter deals with French and British planning in “education and development” through a comparative analysis of documents of two prominent colonial planners in the 1920s: the French colonial minister Albert Sarraut, author of La mise en valeur des colonies françaises (1923) and Sir Frederick Gordon Guggisberg, Governor of the Gold Coast. For Guggisberg, education was the “keystone of progress” and “what is uppermost in the thoughts of all Africans”. Sarraut built his famous doctrine on the “mise en valeur” of the French colonies (1923) on a complex setting of values, where economic progress had to be supported by education, welfare, and health to further the development of what he called “la civilisation coloniale”. Both conceived of education not only as a means of knowledge transfer and professional instruction, but overall as “training of the character”, which made Africans “valuable” subjects of the colonial project.

Keywords:   Education and development, Albert Sarraut, Sir Frederick Gordon Guggisberg, Mise en valeur, Colonial education, French colonial empire, Gold Coast

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