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University engagement and environmental sustainability$
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Patricia Inman and Diana L. Robinson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091629

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091629.001.0001

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Guerrilla geography: describing and defending place for a living (or the renaissance of 100–mile geographers)

Guerrilla geography: describing and defending place for a living (or the renaissance of 100–mile geographers)

Chapter:
(p.47) 4 Guerrilla geography: describing and defending place for a living (or the renaissance of 100–mile geographers)
Source:
University engagement and environmental sustainability
Author(s):

Briony Penn

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091629.003.0005

The abandonment of regional geography in the mid 20th century through pressures of globalization, urbanization and corporatization lost two generations of local knowledge and engagement. Studying place, finding the genius of loci, helping communities to articulate the uniqueness and relevance of place has been left to poets, activists and guerrilla geographers. The chapter looks at the role of guerrilla geography in the renaissance of place, community mapping and naming of place, and ultimately the protection and restoration of place through the word and illustrations of one practitioner from Canada’s rarest ecosystem—the Garry oak meadows overlooking the Salish Sea. Up until 1991, this drought‐adapted ecosystem, now the focus of research on ecosystem resilience in climate change, had no name, no map, no cultural identity beyond Little England, no recognition from academia and no protection. With the return to localism and demand for regional solutions, what is the role for young guerrilla geographers in their respective places across Canada? This discussion will chart a course of meaningful work as we pick up the lost stories of place and weave them with the new. It suggests ways for the academic community to support, educate and legitimize the next generation of guerrilla geographers.

Keywords:   guerrilla geographer, regional, geographer, localism

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