Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
British Rural Landscapes on Film$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Newland

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091575

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091575.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Picturesque, pastoral and dirty: uncivilised topographies in Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights

Picturesque, pastoral and dirty: uncivilised topographies in Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights

Chapter:
(p.148) 9 Picturesque, pastoral and dirty: uncivilised topographies in Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights
Source:
British Rural Landscapes on Film
Author(s):

Stella Hockenhull

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091575.003.0010

A number of contemporary British heritage films signal significant changes in the genre, particularly in terms of their representation of the landscape. Gone are the idyllic English pastoral scenes which present images suitable for National Trust frontispieces. Instead the spectator is presented with the harsh realities of rural life in the nineteenth century, and the countryside relates more to what Andrew Higson (2011) terms ‘dirty realism’: an expression describing films that recount medieval England as bleak and inhospitable, its landscapes hazardous places to inhabit. Indeed, many of the current crop of British costume dramas present wild, rugged settings corresponding to Higson’s definition. Not only are they devoid of the picturesque traits of their predecessors, instead they evoke a sense of menace wrought from their use of landscape. This chapter charts the trajectory of the various substantial debates around landscape and heritage, before focusing on a number of more recent productions. Albeit the films discussed are adaptations from classic literature, through their rural imagery many contemporary films, including Wuthering Heights (Arnold 2011) and Jane Eyre (Fukanaga 2011), appear visually more realist than heritage in style.

Keywords:   British, Rural, Landscape, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Picturesque, Pastoral

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.