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New Zealand'S Empire$
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Katie Pickles and Katharine Coleborne

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091537

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091537.001.0001

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‘Fiji is really the Honolulu of the Dominion’

‘Fiji is really the Honolulu of the Dominion’

tourism, empire, and New Zealand’s Pacific, ca. 1900–35

Chapter:
(p.147) Chapter Eight ‘Fiji is really the Honolulu of the Dominion’
Source:
New Zealand'S Empire
Author(s):

Frances Steel

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091537.003.0008

In this chapter the development of tourism is examined as a key aspect of New Zealand imperialism in the wider Pacific region. Given the centrality of transport infrastructure and technology to tourism, this was the particular purview of the Union Steam Ship Company of New Zealand, a key provider of essential shipping services between Pacific ports from the 1880s. This chapter details the Union Company’s role in developing and promoting the leisure trades between New Zealand and Fiji, a tourism empire that was framed and understood through American engagements in the northern Pacific. The early decades of tourism development in the Pacific indicate the extent to which New Zealand’s interests and ambitions in the region were caught between the two imperial rivals of Britain and the United States.

Keywords:   Tourism, Shipping, Fiji, Pacific region, Imperial rivals

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