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Garden cities and colonial planningTransnationality and urban ideas in Africa and Palestine$
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Liora Bigon and Yossi Katz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090554

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090554.001.0001

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‘May be solved by the construction of garden cities’: German-Jewish literary proposals on garden cities in Eretz Israel

‘May be solved by the construction of garden cities’: German-Jewish literary proposals on garden cities in Eretz Israel

Chapter:
(p.123) Chapter FIVE ‘May be solved by the construction of garden cities’: German-Jewish literary proposals on garden cities in Eretz Israel
Source:
Garden cities and colonial planning
Author(s):

Ines Sonder

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090554.003.0005

This chapter analyses the role of garden city literary visions, none of which were realised, within the Zionist discourse. It discusses the most important German-Jewish literary writing on garden cities in (Ottoman) Palestine in the early twentieth century. This is in light of the fact that the garden city idea was actually the most important town planning model adopted by Zionist planners and architects for the Jewish homeland in Palestine (Eretz Israel). Realised since the 1910s with the establishment of numerous Jewish garden suburbs at the outskirts of Palestinian towns and in new plans for urban expansion, this model was even applied to the layout of contemporary agricultural settlements. This chapter includes Theodore Herzl's vision of town planning and publications by Zionist planners and architects, among them Davis Trietsch, Wilhelm Stiassny and Alex Baerwald. Although never realised, these visions reflected the beginning of modern Zionist town planning. With far-reaching social, political, economic and architectural implications, they were also partly influenced by well-known German architects and planners. Moreover, this chapter reveals that town planning was not disregarded within the early Zionist movement, but was part of a comprehensive social concept in the building of a modern Jewish society in Palestine.

Keywords:   Garden city, Zionist planners, Palestine (Eretz Israel), German-Jewish writing, Theodore Herzl, Davis Trietsch, Wilhelm Stiassny, Alex Baerwald

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