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Northern Ireland in the Second World WarPolitics, economic mobilisation and society, 1939–45$
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Philip Ollerenshaw

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090509

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090509.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

The war economy, 1941–45

The war economy, 1941–45

Chapter:
(p.89) 3 The war economy, 1941–45
Source:
Northern Ireland in the Second World War
Author(s):

Philip Ollerenshaw

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090509.003.0004

In this chapter, the experience of agriculture and key industries including textiles and clothing, shipbuilding and aircraft manufacture are considered, as are labour and industrial relations and how the government began to plan for the post-war world. Feeding the nation was a key priority for the government in London, and agriculture in Northern Ireland not only expanded during war, it also underwent considerable mechanisation. However, the experience of the rural economy, along with the 1941 blitz on Belfast, helped to focus on issues such as rural and urban housing and the provision of social services which would have considerable political consequences in the later stages of the war and in the years afterwards.

Keywords:   Agriculture, Textiles, Clothing, Government contracts, Industrial relations, Aircraft manufacture, Shipbuilding, Post-war planning

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