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Gender, Rhetoric and RegulationWomen's work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55$
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Helen Glew is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Westminster

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090271

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090271.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 18 November 2019

Trying to get equal opportunities: women in the higher grades of the LCC and the Civil Service in the first half of the twentieth century

Trying to get equal opportunities: women in the higher grades of the LCC and the Civil Service in the first half of the twentieth century

Chapter:
(p.64) 2 Trying to get equal opportunities: women in the higher grades of the LCC and the Civil Service in the first half of the twentieth century
Source:
Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation
Author(s):

Helen Glew

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090271.003.0003

Building on chapter one, this chapter examines the similarly gendered nature of women’s work on the higher (executive and administrative) grades in both organisations. It looks at the various types of rhetoric used to preserve women’s subordinate position and the campaigns by women public servants and their supporters (both inside and outside their institutions) to improve women’s opportunities. It provides an account of the debates around segregated versus aggregated grading structures and demonstrates the strength of many campaigners’ arguments that aggregation was the best means to try to bring about long-term equity between men’s and women’s opportunities. The chapter also provides, as far as records allow, a quantitative assessment of women’s likelihood, compared to men’s, of being appointed to a particular grade via the examination process.

Keywords:   Executive grade, Administrative grade, Equal opportunities, ‘glass ceiling’, Gender stereotypes, Women’s movement

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