Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Gender, Rhetoric and RegulationWomen's work in the Civil Service and the London County Council, 1900-55$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Helen Glew is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Westminster

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090271

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090271.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 18 November 2019

Work for women? Challenges to the gendering of routine work in the LCC and the Civil Service

Work for women? Challenges to the gendering of routine work in the LCC and the Civil Service

Chapter:
(p.16) 1 Work for women? Challenges to the gendering of routine work in the LCC and the Civil Service
Source:
Gender, Rhetoric and Regulation
Author(s):

Helen Glew

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090271.003.0002

Work on the lower grades of the Civil Service and LCC was highly gendered and apportioned to women on the basis of gender stereotypes and assumptions about the length of women’s careers. The chapter delineates the myriad ways in which the horizontal segregation of “women’s work” was both rigorously challenged and defended. It provides an analysis of the changes to women’s work during the First World War, and the reception of these, and discusses what happened to conceptions of women’s work at the cessation of hostilities. It further discusses attempts by women and their supporters in the interwar years to aggregate men’s and women’s separate grades and the reactions of employers and male-dominated unions.

Keywords:   Horizontal segregation, aggregation, Routine work, Clerical work, Gender stereotypes, First World War

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.